Every Sedan You Can Still Buy in 2024

By automotive-mag.com 20 Min Read

SUVs are everywhere, but the sedan isn’t dead just yet. In fact, there are still a lot of four doors on sale today. You can thank virtually every automaker that isn’t based in the US for that, which is ironic given how sedans once dominated the highways of America. General Motors is the only holdout, for now anyway.

By our count, there are 60 sedans you can order or buy from dealer stock right now in the US of A. Mind you, this doesn’t include various trim levels or specialty performance variants.

So fear not, four-door fans. You still have choices covering all price points and power levels, automatic or manual transmissions, electric, hybrid, or pure combustion power.

Acura

Acura is keeping the four-door dream alive with two sedans: The Integra and the TLX. The former Integra has a turbocharged 2.0-liter engine making 200 horsepower, and it costs $32,995 for 2024. The larger TLX has a turbo 2.0-liter with 272 hp, and it starts at $46,195. But if you want to get nuts, both cars have a Type S variant that gives you 320 hp on the Integra and 355 hp on the TLX.

Alfa Romeo

Alfa Romeo Giulia

The one and only Alfa Romeo sedan in America is the Guilia. Introduced to the US in 2015, the Giulia comes in a few different flavors. The standard Giulia has a turbocharged 2.0-liter engine making 280 horsepower and paired to an eight-speed automatic transmission, with multiple trim options ranging from the base Sprint to the sportier Competizione. But at the top of the range is the Giulia Quadrifoglio, which packs a twin-turbocharged 2.9-liter Ferrari-derived engine making 505 hp.

Audi

Audi E-Tron GT

Audi remains one of the biggest suppliers of sedans in the US with seven models to choose from—not including the performance variants. It starts with the base A3, which has 201 horsepower and a reasonably affordable $37,490 price tag. At the top of the gas-powered range is the A8, which costs $91,995. And all of these models have either S or RS performance variants—or both.

The Audi E-Tron GT is the automaker’s first fully electric sedan. The base model has 469 horsepower and 522 hp in base form—or up to 591 hp on the RS E-Tron GT. The standard GT costs $108,590 while the RS model is a whopping $149,190. It’s the most expensive sedan the company has ever built.

BMW

BMW 7 Series

BMW is another big proponent of the sedan. The German automaker still has six models on sale in the US, not counting performance and electrified variants—which would make this list significantly longer. The 2 Series Gran Coupe is the entry point of the range at $39,395, with nearly every digit from 3 to 8 (RIP 6) represented. The priciest of which is the new 7 Series, which starts at $97,395 for the gas model and $106,695 for the electric i7.

Bentley

Bentley Flying Spur Speed (2022)

Bentley only has one posh sedan in its lineup: The Flying Spur. Introduced in 2005, the Flying Spur soldiers on into the 2024 model year now in its third iteration with three engine options to choose from. The base engine is a twin-turbo 4.0-liter V-8 engine making 542 horsepower, while the optional twin-turbo 6.0-liter W-12 makes 626 horsepower. But you can also go for the Flying Spur Hybrid, which has a 2.6-liter plug-in-hybrid V-6 with 536 hp and 21 miles of electric range.

Cadillac

2024 Cadillac Celestiq

Cadillac is in the midst of an EV transition, with the $340,000 Celestiq electric sedan going on sale later this year. But two gas sedans still linger: The compact CT4 and mid-size CT5.

The CT4 has a standard turbocharged 2.0-liter engine with 237 horsepower and a more powerful turbocharged 2.7-liter engine with 325 horsepower on the V-Series model. The CT5 has the same base engine with 237 hp, and the CT5-V makes 360 hp. The Blackwing models are the most powerful of the bunch with 472 hp on the CT4-V Blackwing and a whopping 668 hp on the CT5-V Blackwing.

Chevrolet

2024 Chevrolet Malibu

The Chevy Malibu name has been around since the 1960s. But believe it or not, the current Malibu that debuted in 2016 is still alive and kicking in 2024. And it’s surprisingly affordable. The base Malibu starts at $26,195 and every version packs the same turbocharged 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine making 163 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque.

Genesis

2023 Genesis G90 Exterior First Drive Review

The Genesis brand launched with the G80 sedan in 2015. These days, the automaker has an entire range of SUVs, EVs, and sedans, including the compact G70 and the full-size G90 alongside the G80. The G70 is the most affordable of the bunch at $42,750 with the base turbocharged 2.5-liter engine. The G80 starts at $55,650 for the gas model and $75,625 for the EV. While the G90 is the big daddy of the bunch at $90,450.

Honda

Honda Civic Type R

Honda’s two best-sellers are still going strong. The Civic starts at $25,045 and comes in a few flavors for 2024, including Si and Type R. The Accord was updated for the 2023 model year with a new look and a 2.0-liter engine making 204 Horsepower. It costs $28,990 for the gas model and $33,990 for the hybrid.

Hyundai

Hyundai Ioniq 6

Hyundai has an eclectic mix of sedans. The Elantra is the most affordable of the bunch at $22,775 for the gas model and $27,400 for the hybrid. The mid-size Sonata just got an update for 2024 and a new $28,650 starting price. And Hyundai’s first electric sedan, the Ioniq 6, has up to 361 miles of range and a $43,565 starting price.

Jaguar

Jaguar XF

Jaguar is on the cusp of becoming an all-electric automaker, but if you act fast, you can still put a four-door XF in your garage. A turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder is the only engine option, making 246 horsepower in rear-wheel drive P250 trim or 296 in P300 all-wheel drive form. It’s not a performance monster, but with a starting price of $49,800, it’s a handsome, luxurious choice that also marks the end of an era for the British brand.

Kia

2025 Kia K4 Front 3/4

Like Hyundai, Kia is still home to a modest selection of affordable sedans, including the new K4. It’s so new you can’t buy it yet—sales start later this year and it replaces the slightly smaller Forte you can buy right now. Both models offer either a 2.0-liter or turbocharged 1.6-liter engine. Both are exclusively front-wheel drive, and while we don’t have K4 pricing, the Forte starts at $19,990.

The mid-size K5 replaced the Optima for 2021, offering more space, more features, and more power for a $25,590 starting price. The 1.6 turbo is standard here, making 180 horsepower but the GT gets a dual-clutch transmission and 290 horsepower from a larger 2.5-liter turbocharged engine.

Lexus

Lexus IS500 F Sport
  • ES – $43,690
  • IS – $41,235
  • LS – $80,685

Three distinct Lexus sedans offer buyers six different choices. The IS serves as the sporty entry-level model for $41,235, with the IS 500 packing a 472-horsepower V-8 engine. The ES offers a choice of front- or all-wheel drive with four-cylinder, V-6, or hybrid power. The flagship LS is still a Mercedes S-Class competitor, combining size with luxury and technology in a stately sedan with an $80,685 starting price.

Lotus

2025 Lotus Emeya

When the all-electric Emeya goes on sale (which should happen later this year) it will be among the fastest production sedans in the world. Its 800-volt, dual-motor architecture generates 905 horsepower, giving the four-door a 0-60 mph time of less than 3.0 seconds. Active aero and a 50/50 weight distribution should help with handling, and it has a range of 373 miles on the often-generous WLTP cycle for Europe. Prices start at €106,400 for buyers across the pond; pricing for the US is still pending.

Lucid

2024 Lucid Air Sapphire Exterior Front Quarter

When the Lucid Air debuted, it rocked the world with a 0-60 time of under 2.0 seconds. It competes with the Tesla Model S and starts at $71,400 with destination. That still gets you a single-motor, 430-horsepower luxury electric sedan with an EPA-estimated range of 410 miles. Or, there’s the Air Sapphire with 1,234 horsepower and a $249,000 sticker on the window.

Maserati

Maserati Quattroporte

Few vehicles on this list have the history and pedigree of the Quattroporte. First launched in 1963, the current generation is now 10 years old, but its future is uncertain. Amid Maserati’s switch to in-house engines for its new models, the Quattroporte is a holdout still wielding a 572-horsepower twin-turbo Ferrari V-8 in top trim. Despite its age, the luxury sedan still offers a swath of modern tech and driver assists, though it comes at a high price—$139,900 in base trim with a V-6. Stepping up to the V-8 gets close to $160,000.

Mazda

Mazda3

The Mazda 3 is offered in six trim levels, starting with the front-wheel drive 2.5S with 191 horsepower and a $24,170 price tag. At the other end is the 2.5 Turbo Premium Plus, featuring a 250-hp engine with all-wheel drive and a reasonably luxurious interior for this segment. The price takes a hefty jump though, starting at $35,450.

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes-AMG C63 S Performance

At last, we come to Mercedes-Benz, long a purveyor of luxury sedans. The latest C-Class, E-Class, and S-Class are all relatively young in their current iterations, with the sixth-generation E-Class debuting just last year. The C-Class starts at $46,950, with the E-Class holding middle ground at $62,300. From there, it’s a big jump to the cheapest S-Class at $114,500, though many people still consider it the luxury sedan to which all others are compared. For those seeking even more opulence, the Maybach S-Class costs nearly $200,000.

On the electric front, Mercedes is making moves with the EQE and EQS. These standalone sedans have distinctive styling from their ICE counterparts; the EQE starts at $74,900 for a sleek single-motor sedan with 288 horsepower and an EPA-estimated range of 305 miles. The EQS has 329 horsepower and 350 miles of range for $104,400, but you can nearly double the power with the AMG version—if you don’t mind the $147,550 price tag.

Nissan

2024 Nissan Versa

For a little while longer, you can get a sedan from Nissan. The Altima and Versa are dead after 2025, but the Sentra’s future is unclear. For now, the $16,390 Versa isn’t just the cheapest sedan you can buy, it’s the cheapest vehicle in America for 2024. A five-speed manual transmission is standard, and it comes with features like automatic emergency braking. The Sentra offers sharp styling and a bit more power for $20,890, and with the Maxima’s demise, the midsize Altima is now the flagship sedan starting at $26,000.

Polestar

Polestar 2 Long Range Dual Motor

The Polestar 2 is technically a hatchback, but its chunky styling gives it the proportions of a proper sedan. Pricing starts at $47,800 for a single-motor long-range model, which in this case means 320 EPA-estimated miles. There’s 299 horsepower driving the rear wheels, but if you want more performance, the dual-motor version dishes out 455 hp and a 0-60 mph time of 4.1 seconds.

Porsche

2025 Porsche Taycan Turbo GT

A refreshed Taycan debuted in February 2024, adding sharper styling as well as more electric power and technology under the skin. Even the base model dishes out 483 horsepower and has niceties like air suspension. At the other end of the performance spectrum, the new 1,092-horsepower Taycan Turbo GT is one of the fastest production cars you can buy. The refresh is so new that we don’t have official range estimates yet, but we do know the pricing. You’ll pay at least $99,400 for the cheapest Taycan, and as for the Turbo GT, set aside $230,000.

Rolls-Royce

Rolls-Royce Ghost Black Badge

One doesn’t simply walk into a Rolls-Royce dealership and buy an opulent luxury sedan. And few sedans do opulent luxury like the Phantom, from its Shooting Star Headliner and reclining rear seats to the Spirit of Ecstasy hood sculpture and its twin-turbocharged V-12 engine. How much does it cost? That depends on all kinds of customization options Rolls-Royce offers, but if you have to ask, you probably can’t afford it anyway.

The same can be said for the Ghost, which also packs a V-12 under the hood. It’s a touch smaller than the Phantom, making it the posh sedan you’d rather drive than be driven in. But you’ll still find acres of leather and wood inside, and it’s also available as an extended-length model for stretching out in the back seats.

Subaru

2024 Subaru WRX TR

When the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord are your chief competitors, it can be tough to stand out. But the Legacy is still alive and kicking after 34 years, making it the oldest nameplate in Subaru’s lineup. The basic formula hasn’t changed—a flat-four engine sends power to all four wheels, making either 182 naturally aspirated horsepower or 260 with a turbocharger. Its starting price of $24,895, is right there with the cross-town competition, too.

Once a trim level for the Impreza, the rally-bred WRX is nearly as old as the Legacy nameplate. In 2024, it’s the only way to get a smaller Subaru sedan, and for $32,795 you get a turbocharged 271-hp four-cylinder with a six-speed manual and all-wheel drive.

Tesla

Tesla Model 3 Highland

The Model S doesn’t butter Tesla’s bread like it used to, as the Model 3 and Y are far more popular—and cheaper—but the luxury sedan remains in the lineup. The 1,020-horsepower Plaid arrived in 2021, a monster that can hit 60 mph in a claimed 1.99 seconds. The regular Model S, with 670 hp, needs 3.1 seconds to achieve the same feat. It starts at $74,990, while the Plaid costs $89,990.

Tesla introduced an updated Model 3 late last year. The new EV looks quite similar to its predecessor, and Tesla is offering it in two variants: The rear-wheel-drive standard model and the dual-motor, all-wheel-drive Long Range trim. The RWD sedan is cheaper at $38,990. The LR version starts at $47,740 and offers up to 341 miles of range on a single charge. It can also hit 60 mph in 4.2 seconds. The RWD version delivers 272 miles but needs 5.8 seconds to hit 60.

Toyota

2024 Toyota Crown

Despite America falling out of love with sedans, Toyota continues offering the Corolla and Camry, recently adding the high-riding Crown to its portfolio. The Camry remains a perennial best-seller, starting at $27,515. All-wheel drive is optional, as is a hybrid powertrain and a 301-horsepower V-6.

The Corolla isn’t as popular as the Camry, but it serves as a welcoming ambassador for new customers into the brand with its $23,145 starting price and 169-hp 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine. The Hybrid XLE sits at the top of the Corolla lineup at $28,345, but if you want the ultimate Toyota sedan experience, you’ll need to get the Crown. It starts at $41,445 for a 2.5-liter hybrid engine that makes 236 hp, but the range-topping Platinum makes 340 hp while priced at $54,465 to start.

Volkswagen

2024 Volkswagen Jetta

The Jetta is the only Volkswagen sedan still on sale in America. The entry-level S trim starts at $22,660 and packs a 1.5-liter turbocharged engine that makes 158 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed manual is the standard transmission, but an eight-speed automatic is available. The fanciest SEL trim has a price that starts at $30,050, which comes standard with heated and ventilated front seats, heated outboard rear seats, wireless charging, leather seats, sunroof, and an 8.0-inch infotainment touchscreen as standard equipment. And the performance-oriented GLI is still around with 228 hp.

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